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You Have The Courage To Greet Your Fears

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[NOTE: Here’s another en-couraging post from Landon Saunders.]

 

Whenever fears arise—when they knock at the door of your mind—what do you do? Do you bar the doors and ignore the knock? Do you try and drive them away?

No, your courage is strong. You hear the knock, and you open the door to your fears.

In less time than you might imagine, your fears cease to be strangers. Instead, they have become a part of you. Not a part of you to be feared, but a part that is known. They have become a part of your courage, and your courage is stronger than ever because you have come to know them

Amelia Earhart, the great pilot, wrote, “Courage is the price that life exacts for granting peace. The soul that knows it not, knows no release from little things.” Open the door to your fears. You have the courage to greet them.

 

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A Remarkable Act of Human Solidarity

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A TLC reader passed this along:

When you go out and
see the empty streets,
the empty stadiums,
the empty train platforms,
don’t say to yourself,
“It looks like the end of the world.”
What you’re seeing is love in action.
What you’re seeing, in that
negative space, is how much
we do care for each other…
For our Grandparents.
For our immune-compromised
brothers and sisters.
For people we will never meet.
People will lose jobs over this.
Some will lose their businesses.
And some will lose their lives.
All the more reason to take a moment,
when you’re out on your walk,
or on your way to the store,
or just watching the news,
to look into the emptiness
and marvel at all that love.
Let it fill you and sustain you.
It isn’t the end of the world.
It’s the most remarkable act of
human solidarity we may ever witness.

 As Lester Holt says every night on NBC News:

“Take care of yourself and others.”

Keep your head down. And keep your head up.

 

The Fine Art of Today

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“Have a good day” is the common cliché. But what does that mean now?

When Thoreau went into a kind of “quarantine” at Walden Pond for two years, he turned “having a good day” into an art. He wrote:

“I know of no more encouraging fact than the unquestionable ability of man to elevate his life by a conscious endeavor…To affect the quality of the day, that is the highest of arts.”

 The virus has taken much from us. But we still have today. And that is a great deal! As someone has said…

A day is the only package that the gift of life comes wrapped in.

Life is only given to us one day at a time. That’s the way it works.

We can either hunker down like a toad on mowing day and wait for the days to be over…or we can use this time to practice the art of enhancing the day.

And you already have tools for doing that: your courage, your ability to take problems as challenges, your joy, your empathy, your flexibility, your ability to listen well, your patience and persistence—and, yes, your ability to laugh and weep.

Every day you can mix colors like these to create a one-of-a-kind work of art: a day.

I believe we can emerge from this difficult time with an enhanced ability to live a day, to be more present and deliberate in a day, to bring more of ourselves to each day.

We can emerge more skilled at the fine art of “having a good day.”

And we’ll probably find that’s a key to having a good life.

Navigating This New Curve In The Road

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NOTE: Today’s reflection is from Landon Saunders. If you would like to sign up for his weekly email, there’s a place to click at the end.

 

I greet you today with consideration, quietness, understanding, confidence, and love.

The ancient Greek philosopher Heraclitus wrote, “No matter how many roads you travel, you can never reach the end of the soul.” Today is a time for discovery of new places in our souls.

In many ways we are all in a new place. Days, weeks, months, and years of routine, experience, and expectations are now disrupted. Some are alone, isolated. Some are with family in unexpected ways which can be challenging, even in the presence of great love.

Some face financial pressures that couldn’t have been imagined even days ago. Health officials, people in government, companies, citizens are on high alert and working day and night to address this crisis. Yet, all of us appear left to our own resourcefulness in so many ways. Most of us have not faced such a time as this.

Heraclitus reminds us we have areas of our souls we’ve never discovered. Maybe we are on such a journey in this crisis.

First, this means that in the midst of all we’re dealing with…you have you. You are an inexhaustible source of resiliency, wisdom, endurance, and yes, humor. You have depth and will travel to new places in your soul. So, right now, take a moment…and accept that…embrace the moment fully, and you’ll be on your way!

Second, this focuses concern on others in ways that may be unusual for us. We notice others. We’re careful about physical contact. But that concern goes beyond protection from the virus; it connects us to one of our greatest strengths and to one of our world’s greatest needs—our concern and care for others.

Among all the things we have to do to get through this time, if we emerge with a deeper understanding of ourselves and with a greater concern for others, we will all be stronger and of more use to the world in the unfolding future.

 I believe that I will, that you will, and that alone and together, we will. Blessings on all for this journey.

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Staying Strong in the time of the Coronavirus 

As long as the coronavirus is a threat, The Living Conversation will be devoted to bringing you the best, most encouraging insights and inspiration we can find.

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