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You Don’t Have to Swing at Every Pitch

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Landon Saunders

            Have you ever been in one of those batting cages? You stand there, bat on your shoulder, while a mechanical “pitcher” hurls balls at you. Here’s a high hard one—Swing! Oops…And now one around the knees…Finally, and most devastating of all, one comes straight at you, and then, at the last minute, dips and dances tauntingly just beyond the reach of your flailing bat.

            A few minutes in a batting cage can be good preparation for our lives. It reminds us we don’t have to swing at most of what’s thrown at us during the day. Instead, when the right opportunities do come, we have the energy and concentration necessary to connect with them.

            As Euripides put it, “The one who knows when not to act is wise. Bravery is mostly forethought.”

            Are you beginning to sense anew how exciting the insight is:

            I have all the time I need to do everything I really need to do in my life.

             To me, this is the cornerstone of building a life that indeed wins seven out of eight days a week. In fact, once we’ve internalized this insight, we discover we’ve already won!

            But we must think carefully about this, because it really involves your whole world view.

            What we’re sure of is, our frantic impatience is a great killer of love and life. We need more re-creation.

Recreation is Re-creation

            I’ve had weeks when my work has been so rewarding that if you were to take me away and put me under a beach umbrella, I’m afraid you’d only succeed in making me miserable.

            I’m finding that leisure time is any time I can do what I like doing, even if it’s downright hard work. When I become engrossed in something, I forget all about time schedules and pressures.

            People react to leisure time in different ways. Some are workaholics and face an upcoming weekend or holiday as a painful interruption. Others live for the weekend, barely tolerating their workdays.

            The people I admire most are the ones who know how to enjoy both work and play, who find energy in the rhythm between the two.

            Basically, leisure is an attitude, a condition of the soul. It’s up to us whether free time is barren and boring, or fruitful and transforming.

            If our culture or life is without spirit, leisure only heightens the sense of emptiness. When people realize they can take time to discover who they are, why they are here, where they are going—patiently, calmly, gracefully putting their life together—that’s true re-creation.

Thought for the Day: I don’t have to swing at everything that’s thrown at me today. I can let many things go—then put my whole heart into whatever I choose to do. I may not do great things today, but I have time to at least do small things in a great way.

COMING FRIDAY: Beyond Working for the Weekend

[This is an excerpt from, How To Win 7 Out Of 8 Days A Week by Landon Saunders, which is out of print but is used by permission. In 2024 we will work through the entire book, with posts on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.]

Making Time for the Infinite

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Landon Saunders

 

            One night I was walking on the beach, watching the stars come out. I noticed a mother standing with her little girl. The little girl was looking up at the sky; the mother was looking at her watch. Every few seconds, she’d say: “Mary, it’s getting late. We have to get back home.”

            The little girl didn’t seem to hear. She was just gazing up at those sparkling gems eons away, her mouth open, and her eyes aglow.

            Finally the mother insisted, “Mary, we really have to go. Please!” The little girl looked at her mother as though hearing her for the first time. In a soft voice, she said, “Why?” Her mother started to say something about dinner and the time and who knows what else, when Mary raised her hand and pointed a finger at the sky. “But Mommy,” she said, “Look!”

            And do you know, that tired, fretful mother looked up, and she too saw the wonderful sight…but this time through the eyes of her daughter.

            And I thought to myself: “It’s not as late as you think, my friend; it’s not too late for you to see the sky.”

            But now we have a new distraction in our day. Much of the time for smelling the roses, seeing the sky and feeling wonder is evaporating in the pale blue light of what may be the most dominating guest ever allowed into our living room.

Putting the One-Eyed Monster On a Diet

            How are you getting along with the one-eyed monster in your living room? We have such a hard time getting everything done that needs to be done, and yet we have this one-eyed monster in our house that devours our time—hours of it every day—with hardly a whimper of protest from us.

            I was thinking about this the other night when I sat down to feed my own monster an hour of my time. Before I knew it, the monster had swallowed that hour plus three more! While my back was turned, I guess.

            If your monster is still out of control, maybe it’s time to get mad.

            Years ago, there was a town in Connecticut that made a community project out of doing without TV for the entire month of January. Instead, several nights a week the local public library featured concerts and comedians and visits by famous writers. Even the kids seemed to love it.

            One father, in fact, got so caught up in it that he made a bet with his two teenage daughters that they couldn’t stay away from TV for a year. They did. He lost. It cost him $2,000.

            Of course, it’s true that television has filled many lonely hours, and that it provides needed entertainment when “getting away from it all” is important. Educational Television can be tremendous. But for many people, it has become addictive. Take it away, and they suffer almost like junkies in withdrawal.

            But you still may need to get back in control of this TV tyrant—even if you have to go cold turkey. Only a turkey would stuff himself with TV, anyhow. At the very least, put the one-eyed monster on a diet.

Thought For the Day: Maybe, if we were freed from so much television or screen time—and made more time for wonder—we could go out and live for ourselves some of the adventures our heroes only show us on the tube.

COMING WEDNESDAY: You Don’t Have To Swing At Every Pitch

[This is an excerpt from, How To Win 7 Out Of 8 Days A Week by Landon Saunders, which is out of print but is used by permission. In 2024 we will work through the entire book, with posts on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.]

“I Just Can’t Look At Everything Hard Enough”

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Landon Saunders

 

            “Nothing ever happens around here.” Same old place, same old streets, same old job, same old marriage partner…

            A sure sign we’ve lost the spirit of wonder. But no sign that nothing important is happening.

            Thornton Wilder captures this war between the spirit of wonder and the drag of boredom in his play Our Town. The heroine, Emily, goes through her brief life and misses most of the thrill—that is, the first time she goes through. But after she dies, she gets another opportunity to go back and relive her twelfth birthday. Oh, what an experience she has!

            Entering the world of her childhood, she cries, “There’s Mr. Morgan’s drugstore. And the high school! I just can’t look at everything hard enough.”

            How often, stumbling through life with our faces glued to the ground, we miss the wonder of what’s happening all around us.

            “Catch any news down at the store, Ezra?” “Nope, nothin’ ‘cept a new baby was born over at Tom and Mary Lincoln’s last night.”

            “Mrs. Franklin, don’t tell me you’re expecting your fifteenth?” “Yes, and if it’s a boy, I’m going to name him Benjamin.”

            As John Gardner says, “History never looks like history when you are living through it.”

            The next time you feel bored, be grateful for the warning rather than going off the deep end. It’s just time for you to start growing again. And remember, no matter how much time you’ve lost to boredom…you’ve still got enough time. Enough time for wonder. As Emily said, “I just can’t look at everything hard enough.”

Thought For The Day: Today, take some time to look at those familiar routines and faces—but this time, look harder. Look with eyes of wonder.

 COMING MONDAY: Taking Time For the Infinite

[This is an excerpt from, How To Win 7 Out Of 8 Days A Week by Landon Saunders, which is out of print but is used by permission. In 2024 we will work through the entire book, with posts on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.]

Take Revenge On Your Boredom

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 Landon Saunders

 

            Some say the human race is divided into two great hordes—the bores and the bored. Well, I’m convinced that boredom is nature’s way of telling you to go deeper into your life. It’s an early warning signal that you must develop more inner resources or you’ll dry up and blow away.

           The artist Salvador Dali told an interviewer: “I do not take drugs. I am drugs.”

            These are the words of a man who claimed he never suffered from boredom. He once said, “At five I wanted to be Napoleon, and from there my ambition went up.”

            We’re told that people fulfill only about ten percent of their potential. So no wonder we’re bored. Do you want to leave the hordes of the bores and the bored? Here are some tips.

  • Stop covering up your boredom with compulsive eating, shopping and television, or with any other addiction. You may need some help, but you can do it.

 

  • Talk to your boredom. Find out what part of your life needs attention. Leave the superficial. Find some dream space. You need to do some of that all-important “invisible work.”

  • Now take revenge on your boredom. Living well is the best revenge. Exult in the possible. Learn to play. Remember, you are finding new perspective; and as you find it, watch what happens.

Thought For The Day: Take revenge on your boredom. Living well is the best revenge. Exult in the possible. Learn to play.

 

COMING FRIDAY: Recapturing a Sense of Wonder

[This is an excerpt from, How To Win 7 Out Of 8 Days A Week by Landon Saunders, which is out of print but is used by permission. In 2024 we will work through the entire book, with posts on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.]

The Freedom That Circumstances Can’t Take Away

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Landon Saunders

 

            Once a leaf was fastened to the limb of a big oak tree and he wasn’t very happy. He was tired of hanging around that limb all the time. He complained about not being free.

            Well, one day, with a gust of wind as an accomplice, he snapped himself right off the green tree and went floating down to the ground, gleefully calling back to the others, “I’m free. I’m free.”

            A few days passed, and he began to turn brown around the edges. Sadly he called back to the others, “This isn’t freedom’ this is death.”

            Maybe you are finding it difficult to affirm your life where you are. The answer probably wouldn’t be found in a change of circumstances. Freedom is rarely found by running away; it’s found in being still long enough to decide to live in joy—regardless of the circumstances.

            The wonderful thing about being a human being who knows he has enough time is you don’t let the things around you dictate your life. You don’t simply react. You don’t let circumstances or the behavior of other people decide how you are going to act. You know that freedom is an inner resource and not a matter of running away. This also means that real freedom is not something that circumstances can take away from you.

            You are free to find patience and joy even in the midst of adversity, because you know there is a time for every purpose under heaven.

            Do you know why the leaf wanted to be free from the tree? Well, I don’t know for sure, either, but I suspect it may have had something to do with…boredom. But the leaf failed to realize that boredom is not a cue to jump off. Boredom has an important message.

Thought For The Day: Freedom is rarely found in running away; real freedom is found in being still long enough to decide to live in joy—regardless of the circumstances.

COMING WEDNESDAY: Taking Revenge On Your Boredom

[This is an excerpt from, How To Win 7 Out Of 8 Days A Week by Landon Saunders, which is out of print but is used by permission. In 2024 we will work through the entire book, with posts on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.]

Coming Home To Life

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Landon Saunders

[Our last post finished with this line: “When you understand time and what joy means to time, you’ll be ready to enjoy every moment of your life.”]

            Consider the little boy who said, “Dad, what holds up the world?” And his dad said, “Son, the world is carried on the back of a giant turtle.” The little boy went away, and he thought about that for a while; then he came back and said, “Well Dad, what does that turtle sit on?” His father replied, “On the back of another giant turtle.” And before the little boy could get the words out to ask his next question, the father said, “Son, it’s turtles all the way down!”

            To make our lives and relationships work, we must understand that it’s joy all the way down.

            When you understand that, you can quit running…quit running scared.

No Longer a Fugitive

            In the 1970s there was a popular television show called The Fugitive. It was a strange sort of show, and yet it appealed to a lot of people. I think it was because, somewhere inside, we all feel like fugitives at times. We’re all running away from something—a painful childhood, fateful decisions, embarrassing failures.

            Some of us have been running so long that we’ve forgotten how it feels to stop. Let’s imagine for a moment what it would be like…to stop running.

            You discover a place of quiet, a place of acceptance. Where? Marcus Aurelius said, “Nowhere can a person find a quieter or more untroubled retreat than in his own soul.” In that quiet place you could begin the work of understanding and rebuilding your life.

            This is not an escapist dream. The old relationships, the old job, the same faces will still be there. The change would be in your awareness, your insight. In your quiet place you would discover new perspective on what it means to live. You would begin seeing with new eyes—a new heart. No longer a fugitive, you’ve simply come home—home to life.

            This can happen if you take time to think about your life. You feel “stuck” only when you fail to take time to know that you have enough time to do all you are supposed to do with your life.

COMING MONDAY: Finding True Freedom

[This is an excerpt from, How To Win 7 Out Of 8 Days A Week by Landon Saunders, which is out of print but is used by permission. In 2024 we will work through the entire book, with posts on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.]

 

Carrying Your Day With Joy

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From PART ONE of How To Win 7 Out of 8 Days a Week:

 

Landon Saunders

 

            If I fail to cut the string to worries, regrets, or fears, I’ll soon be like the man who, when his alarm would go off in the morning, would start sneezing. He would have sneezing fits. He finally discovered what his problem was—he was allergic to consciousness!

            Now, how in the world do you become allergic to consciousness? You become allergic to consciousness when you don’t know how to carry time; you don’t know how to live your day.

            For example, your day may have too many extraneous items in it. If it does, your day will feel burdensome and you won’t like to face it.

            Feeling burdened will, in turn, create tension in your relationships, which also makes a day joyless. If tension is what you face in your day, you may wake up sneezing!

            Learning how to carry time means you begin to understand what a day really is and how to best use it. If you understand this and act on it, you will find it easier to get up in the morning. You still may not like it. Nobody much is going to like the alarm going off in the morning announcing that it’s time to get up. But, one thing is for sure, if you are confident that your burdens for that day will be okay for you, you will be able to get up with a new sense of freshness.

            What does this require? It demands that you know how to get a better grip on your day, that you know what to hold onto and what to let go of.

“Get a Grip, What a Trip!”

            I was walking through a subway station one day when I saw where someone had painted across a wall, “Get a Grip, What a Trip.” I don’t know what the person who spray-painted the words meant by them, but I know what it made me think of. I thought about how to carry time, how to carry my day. Get a grip. What a trip. Get the right grip and you can carry time. You can carry the burden of your life no matter what it is.

            Here is a word that helps me get a grip on my day: euphoria. Euphoria is an interesting word. First of all, eu means the good, the calm—balanced joy. Phoria, another Greek word, means “to carry.” Put these two parts together and you have “to carry with joy.”

            Understanding that you have enough time will enable you to carry time with joy. You’ll quit treating your life like some kind of disease that must be cured; you will begin, instead, to respond to the joyfulness of life.

            Let me describe the person who carries time with joy, the person who lives in euphoria.

             First of all, she is a person who accepts everything about life. This means she accepts herself. It means she accepts others—just as they are. It means she accepts the pain. She accepts the hurt. Carrying time with joy means that you’re nurtured by all of your experiences. Your victories…they nourish you. You pain also nourishes you.

            And this gets to the very heart of life—because at the heart of life, we must learn to be joyful, right now, with the people we love. Nobody can carry the weight of a marriage without euphoria. It’s too heavy. Take a vow to be joyful. Take a vow to live with your children in joy. Take a vow to be happy with your work. You can carry with joy.

            When you understand time and when you understand what joy means to time, you’ll be ready to enjoy every moment of your life!

 

This excerpt from How To Win 7 Out of 8 Days a Week, by Landon Saunders, is used by permission. During 2024, we will get through the entire book with posts on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. Enjoy! -GM

COMING FRIDAY: Coming Home To Life

 

“Exulting in The Possible”

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From PART ONE: Time To Discover You Have All the Time You Need, cont.

 

Landon Saunders

[This excerpt from the book, How To Win 7 Out Of 8 Days A Week by Landon Saunders, is used by permission. In 2024 we will work through the whole book, with posts on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.]

 

            Martin Buber said, “Play is exulting in the possible.”

            I know of a successful comedy writer whose gift for making people laugh is well known. His sense of humor wins him invitations to parties all over town, but he rarely accepts. The truth is, though is work is to make others laugh, he’s not laughing much himself. His own life and work are a drudgery. Cracking jokes at a party is as much work as writing a television script.

            Do you feel this kind of pressure? Do you feel you always must be the life of the party? Is every conversation a test of your social skills, a measure of your charms? If so, you too may be good at entertaining a roomful of people, but you may not be having much fun yourself.

            The next time you’re with people socially—perhaps this weekend—instead of trying to be the life of the party, relax and enjoy your life at the party.

            “Exulting in the possible” means exulting in what is possible in this very moment. This is how the fictional character Zorba the Greek approaches time. Zorba says, “I have stopped thinking about yesterday, and I have decided that I am not going to think about tomorrow. I am going to live in the present. I ask myself, ‘Zorba, what are you doing this moment?’ I say, ‘I’m going to sleep.’ ‘Then sleep well, Zorba.’ ‘Zorba, what are you doing now?’ ‘I’m working.’ ‘Then work well.’ ‘What are you doing now, Zorba?’ ‘I’m kissing a woman.’ ‘Well, kiss her well, Zorba. Don’t think about anything. Get on with it.’”

Cut The String

            Being present in each moment of your life is much better than getting all tied up in knots. When I’m here, I think I ought to be over there. And when I’m over there, I think I ought to be here. How can anybody live with that?

            James Thurber remembered that his mother used to say, “Your father’s tied up at the office.” As a child, he would get this mental image of his father sitting in his office chair, tied down with big ropes, unable to move. Well, you say, that’s just a child’s imagination. And, of course, that’s true. Yet, there are many more people bound and tied down by life than even a child might imagine.

            If you’re all tied down, how can you get anywhere? First, remember that getting loose begins in your mind, not with your routines.

            One day Zorba’s boss said to him, “I want to be free, Zorba.” Zorba looked at him and said, “You can’t be free, boss. ‘Cause you’re on a long, long string, and the only way you can ever be free is to cut the string.’

            You may find you’re on a long string. Cut the string and you can be free. What is the string? For some it is regrets. Cut the string of regrets. Cut the strings of worry. Cut the strings of anxiety. You have to quit linking yourself to your losses.

COMING MONDAY: Carrying Time With Joy

 

Three Deaths, One Life

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From PART ONE: Time To Discover You Have All the Time You Need, cont.

 [This excerpt from the book, How To Win 7 Out Of 8 Days A Week by Landon Saunders, is used by permission. In 2024 we will work through the whole book, with posts on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.]

            “Invisible labor” yields insights that can totally transform your life. The first part of this invisible labor is to take a look at the condition of the soil of your life.

            A biblical parable touches on this point. A sower goes out to sow seed, and some of the seed falls beside the road where the soil is hard-packed and people keep trampling on it and the birds come and eat up all the seed. Death number one.

            Some of the seed falls on rocks and, of course, because there is no moisture, it soon withers and dies. Death number two.

            Some falls among thorns and thistles. The seeds spring up, but are soon choked out. Death number three.

            Maybe you can find your experience in this story. Let’s call the first soil “The Grand Central Station” kind of person. You are always on the move; your life is unexamined; the soil of your life is hard-packed. There’s no depth. There’s no solitude. You’ve found no dream space.

            Or you might be a person who is more nearly characterized by the seed that falls on rocky soil. You are isolated. As Paul Simon’s song says, “I’m a rock, I’m an island. And a rock feels no pain, and an island never cries.” Yes, you say you cared, and you got hurt. So you decided you aren’t going to do that anymore. You’ve closed yourself off.

            The thorns-and-thistles person never really focuses on what his life means. He doesn’t have the benefit of his own life’s experience. He is quickly distracted, and any transformation of his life is quickly choked out.

            Finally, there is the good soil, the person who has some grasp of the times of his life. Great things grow in a life like this. This life understands that it has time today to grow, time for love, work, humor and faith.

            Look at those four things again. Love. Work. Humor. Faith. Do you see? Taking time to grow these four things in your life makes your life very productive and rich.

            And it takes all four. Love without meaningful work becomes a drug. And work without love can be a substitute. Humor without faith is shrill and joyless. And faith without humor is often life-denying.

            Remember, you have all the time you need to do everything you really need to do in your life. This includes time to play, which is so important to a life of wholeness and peace.

COMING FRIDAY: Play Is Exulting In The Possible

 

 

Finding Some Dream Space

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From PART ONE: Time To Discover You Have All the Time You Need, cont.

[This excerpt from the book, How To Win 7 Out Of 8 Days A Week by Landon Saunders, is used by permission. In 2024 we will work through the whole book, with posts on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. So enjoy…and pass it on!]

            No one ever dies too soon. This is my person conviction. The length of life is important, but it is not so important as the quality and meaning of life. Disraeli said, “The tragedy is not that life is too brief; the tragedy is that life is too small.”

            One second of human life is meaningful and important. One is not doomed to failure as a human being simply because one’s life is cut short. The real meaning of life is not determined by the clock; it’s finally determined by the choices you make every day about how to live your life. What choices did you make today? Were they the right ones? Even if they weren’t, you still have time to do everything you really need to do with your life.

            A life that is fair of face is a life that knows about time. How often I have said, “I don’t have time.” I’d love to learn to do this or that, accomplish this or become that—but “I just don’t have enough time.”

            This approach to time leads to a life full of regrets, frustration and, above all, anxiety. We cover a lot of this anxiety with busyness. We are like little bees. And we may even be proud that we don’t have time for anything. We buzz proudly, “I am…I am…Busy.”

            I’ve had to get over this busyness. I’ve quit rushing frantically through my life. The model for my life is no longer the busy bee. I want to do what no bee has ever done: I want to dream great dreams and live them to the fullest.

            To have a life that is full of grace, to be free to dream, you have to find some “dream space.”

             The novelist Saul Bellow said the hardest thing for him was to give himself enough “dream space.” By that he meant to find the time and place that allows creativity to do its work. I think we all need more dream space. More dream time.

            Think of your life as the work of art you are creating. Without a dream you will drift, you will have no place to stand. With a dream, your life will have vision and purpose and direction.

            A dream provides a basis for strong relationships with others, and it holds you when trouble comes and sweeps over you. With a dream you won’t complain about life—demanding, “Why doesn’t somebody do something?” No, with a dream you’ll say, “I’m somebody, I can do something.”

            I like this thought from Victor Hugo. “A man is not idle just because he is absorbed in thought. There is visible labor and there is invisible labor.”

            You can go beyond busyness. You have time to create “dream space” in your life. No labor is more important for your life and time than “invisible labor.”

Today I’ll fight back against the tyranny of busyness. I’ll create a little space of time in which I can think and dream about my life, about the kind of life I want to live and the kind of person I most want to be.

COMING WEDNESDAY: Three Deaths, One Life

 

You Have All the Time You Need

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[This excerpt from the book, How To Win 7 Out Of 8 Days A Week by Landon Saunders, is used by permission. In 2024 we will work through the whole book, with posts on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.]

            Do you have a problem with time? You say you never have enough? Well, hang on, because I have some ideas for you that will at least give you a different way to look at time.

            More than any of us probably realize, our days are shaped by the clock. The clock tells us when to get up, when to leave for work, when to eat lunch, when to head for home in the evening and, finally, when to go to bed.

            The clock also tells us something else. It tells us we are timed. We only have so much time between the time of birth and the time of death. The clock ticks off this interval in seconds, minutes, hours, days, years. The clock records the quantity of time, but it tells us little about the meaning of time. It doesn’t tell me whether I’m doing the things I should be doing to fill my days with meaning. It says nothing of the priorities of my life. Unless I deliberately think about time, I’m apt to awaken near the end of my life very discouraged about the way I’ve spent my time.

            What can I do about this? Here are two critical ideas: First, you have all the time you need to do everything you really need to do in your life. Second, no one ever dies too soon. Either every day is a good day to day, or no day is a good day to die. Puzzled? Let’s continue to think for a few moments.

            I’ve suggested you have all the time necessary for what you must do in this world. I believe that. However, I realize this will be your personal story only if you think about what you’re doing with your life. Are you doing the important things?

            One way to determine whether you’re doing the important things is to ask this question: If you knew you were going to die in twenty-four hours, what would you do with those hours? Does your answer have any connection to the way you’re living your life today?

            Your answer will lead you to consider the most critical things in your life. You must structure your present life so that it provides for what would be most important to you if you only had one more day to live.

Today, I’ll remember that I have enough time to do what I really need to do in this world—and I’ll relax. I’ll think about what would be most important to me if this were my last day, and I’ll give those things some real attention.

Coming Monday: Beyond Busy-ness to Dreaming Great Dreams For Your Life

How To Win 7 Out of 8 Days a Week

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Landon Saunders

 

[This excerpt from the book, How To Win 7 Out Of 8 Days A Week by Landon Saunders, is used by permission. In 2024 we will work through the whole book, one excerpt at a time, with posts on Monday, Wednesday and often on Friday.]

 

Introduction

            The central thesis of this book is, You have enough time to do everything you really need to do in your life. And, even more startling, you have enough time—this week—to do everything you need to do. A week is a small version of your life. Approach your week right, and you will be approaching your life right.

            The book is divided into seven parts, corresponding to seven days of the week. To help us structure the parts, we’re using an old nursery rhyme, as you’ll see below. Take a few moments to think about these titles; they will give you a good feel for the things anyone can focus on each week to win as a human being.

PART ONE: MONDAY’S CHILD IS FAIR OF FACE

Time To Discover You Have All The Time You Need

 

PART TWO: TUESDAY’S CHILD IS FULL OF GRACE

Time For Joy

 

PART THREE: WEDNESDAY’S CHILD IS FULL OF WOE

Time For Tears And Laughter

 

PART FOUR: THURSDAY’S CHILD HAS FAR TO GO

Time For The Education You Most Need

 

PART FIVE: FRIDAY’S CHILD IS LOVING AND GIVING

Time To Love And Be Loved

 

PART SIX: SATURDAY’S CHILD WORKS FOR A LIVING

Time To Be Grasped By Greatness

 

PART SEVEN: AND A CHILD BORN ON SUNDAY IS WISE AND FAIR AND FINDS ITS WAY

Time To Be The Best Possible You

            This book is personal because it grows out of my own life and my struggle to communicate with others. I’ve tried to leave you lots of room to think beyond what I’ve written. In some instances, I’ve simply raised questions for you. Having the right questions to think about can result in more growth than answers alone could stimulate. So have fun with the questions.

            You have enough time every week to do what’s important in your life.

            You have enough time to win as a human being.